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Out of This World




0696 PA8508 Out of This World


Run time 0:13:16
Audio/Visual sound, color

Reviews

Reviewer: EJ Stat - - August 5, 2011
Subject: Don't hate the ecologists
For all the haters of ecologists(or the green people) take the time to read about Easter Island. Think of it as the most miniature version of earth. They cut every last tree down just to sustain what they perceived was their right way of living. Lucky for us it was only an island, and not the whole planet! It always amazes me that the people who call themselves conservatives are the least conservative of all.
Reviewer: bhyder - - August 1, 2011
Subject: I too love an appliance.
This is a beautiful piece of corporate propaganda. Our stepford wife's transformation across different ethnicities symbolizes a cosmopolitan womanhood desirous of such a modern kitchen.
Films like these are so interesting for people who like science fiction, both reflecting and influencing public expectations (or at least speculations) concerning the future.
It would be easy to ream this movie for a naive treatment of the environment and the woman animal in specific. In the media landscape of the early 60's, it was effective marketing. Advertising is more subtle today, but seldom as elegant.
Reviewer: USABG58 - - July 21, 2011
Subject: Eco-Fascists should have broken down the door!
Eco-Fascists should have broken down the door to this person's home and dictated: you will live with a small eco-foot-print! Eat only raw, locally-grown vegetables and fruit! Have two or less children only! Support wild-life, endangered species! The planet might have been saved. Now, it's too late?
Reviewer: Steve Carras - - November 9, 2010
Subject: Familiar stock music
Before our friend "Dodsworth the Cat" or somebody else jumps in, if you've seen the cult classic "The Night Of the Living Dead", the open stock cue is in part of it, and on the unofficial soudntrack it's titled "Dawn".

Composers whose stock cues wound up in that one were Ib Glindemann, Bill Loose and John Seely [the names everybody knows], Phil Green, Jack Meakin, Spencer Moore, David Rose, and Geordie Hormel among others, and you may recognize other cues. [See also "Century 21 Calling","One Got Fat","Shopping Can Be Fun", and others on this archive.]
Reviewer: enola - - November 7, 2010
Subject: You would think we are force-feeding our children this instead of eco-gate
It would be nice just once in a while to read objective reviews instead of the same old and tired leftist mantras.

Who was the target audience? That's right, the adult children of parents who had lived through the Great Depression and WWII. They had prosperity on their minds, and just maybe they wanted to replace mom's old wringer washer or washboard with something a bit more modern.

Enjoy the trip down memory lane. Brought to you by the evil Western civilization that gave the world penicillin, electricity, sanitation, and so much more.
Reviewer: queeniemusic - - November 7, 2010
Subject: This should be studied by the aliens once humans are extinct
Anyone who is nostalgic for 1964 needs to sit down and watch this hellish nightmare commercial for appliances. The first half, where the earth is pillaged (it's only a model) for its resources bring to mind the current oil sand travesty going on in Canada, is morbidly depressing. The second half is so racist it makes me want to eat a gun. When the orgasmic-for-appliances housewife minces about like a brain-damaged Madame Butterfly and fondles the dishwasher like a lover, it tells you that the culture that produced this film was seconds away from the apocalypse. We're lucky we made it to 1965.
Reviewer: nighthouse66 - - January 25, 2010
Subject: some people just aren't getting this...
...and that's a shame. very little has been said about the needlessly phantasmagorical nature of this advertisement nor about the imagination that is found here that is lacking into today's commercials. there is a surreal technicolor quality about this that seems way out of proportion to the purpose. its like some ad guy FINALLY got to let his hair down and EXPERIMENT. i mean, look at the fake space scenery, it looks like its made out of spark plugs. how many martinis did it take to think this stuff up? why is it so far out? its wonderfully ludicrous and lush. they were trying to make some sort of ART FILM here. its like someone commissioned jean cocteau to make an advert about appliances. this is one of the very best in this whole genre, along with "A Touch of Magic" and "Design for Dreaming".
Reviewer: antolintinez - - August 16, 2009
Subject: Call now! Call now!
Absolutely right. You can critize into the context of something (painting, book, film, ad). I personally prefer this kind of advertisement than the nowadays ads that are a half hour nightmare, showing all the time (all the time) the benefits of something that you don't need it (see Socrates story). And all the time (all the time) telling you Call now! Call now! If you don't call now (just right now) you are going to suffer the rest of your life because you lost the special price for you (only for you). This commercial looks that is the final part of some visit to the factory, or the show at factory, accentuating what you saw in the show to buy GM products. At least you don't have to CALL NOW! CALL NOW!
Reviewer: thatemailname - - April 4, 2009
Subject: View history in its historical context
Reading the comments here, I notice there is no sense of historical context in them. A film made in 1964, for what was primarily an advertising purpose, can't be judged by the sensibilities of 40+ years later.

It's also apparent by the comments that the reviewers have little or no knowledge of what kind of exhibit this film was created for. They seem to find a completely undeserved smug self-satifisfaction in the fact that the predictions of the future made in the exhibit were in some cases wildly off the mark, and in others would be frowned upon today.

One other thing to keep in mind when viewing this film - back in 1964, the world was a much *larger* place than it is today, and to the typical American (who is the audience for this film after all) the other countries mentioned in the film were for the most part still exotic, far-away places that they had had no first-hand experience with.
Reviewer: ERD - - September 30, 2006
Subject: Out Of This World Is Out Of Reality
First the film shows a future that dangerously alters the ecology of the earth and strips it of its natural resources, then it uses an international theme to show off kitchen appliances made by Frigidare. The actress sometimes looked silly prancing about as a person of different nationalities. This production certainly doesn't hold up now- but then it was never good to begin with.
Reviewer: bread - - September 27, 2006
Subject: Medicore!
I found this film medicore. If you like old kitchens, you might think about downloading it, but is not really that good. It just seemed like one overlong ad.
Reviewer: june(dive)travels - - November 7, 2004
Subject: Not sure
I really sit between nostalgia and science-fiction.
I donôt know, but maybe I am just too young for this.
Reviewer: Marysz - - September 1, 2004
Subject: Out of This World, But Still in a Kitchen
A housewife goes alone to the GM Pavilion at the 1964 WorldÃÂs Fair and is invited by the announcer to be ÃÂalone with her thoughts.ÃÂ He drones on about the world of the future where underwater farms feed the worldÃÂs population, who now live the ultra-futuristic ÃÂMetropolis of Tomorrow.ÃÂ

For all the its grandiose predictions about the future thereÃÂs one thing this film finds impossible to envisage: a woman outside of the kitchen. WeÃÂre treated to a reverie of the housewife alone in the ÃÂKitchen of TomorrowÃÂ in various foreign climesÃÂÃÂItÃÂs just like being in the Mediterranean! It is! Yummy!ÃÂ From there she goes to a kitchen in the ÃÂexotic eastÃÂ and then on to sunny Spain. What makes these dream kitchens of tomorrow so enticing? Maybe itÃÂs the fact that there arenÃÂt any real world husbands or kids around demanding to be fed and taken care of. And in each exotic clime, she gets to have different makeup and a new hairdo. Not to mention an alluring new wardrobe.

Inane as this film is, it contains a kernel of unintentional truth. Were housewives of the time desperate for new appliances or desperate to have some time alone to themselves? A child calls out ÃÂHey, Mom!ÃÂ and sheÃÂs back to being her plain-Jane self, in her real kitchen and her husband is home from the office. Fortunately, a pot roast seems to have cooked itself in the oven for dinner while she was at away at the WorldÃÂs Fair.

ÃÂWhat a day!ÃÂ she muses to herself, The film started with a male voice-over, but it ends with the housewife speaking in her own voice. ÃÂMy family will never believe me!ÃÂ The films ends with a dissolve from a close-up of her radiant face to her empty kitchen. WhereÃÂd she go? Could she have gone back Out of This World? Maybe she's decided she prefers the glamorous solitude of the Kitchen of the Future to her subservient life in the Kitchen of the Present.
Reviewer: Spuzz - - December 30, 2003
Subject: Calling all space cadets!
I'll say this up front. Download this movie NOW. I don't know WHY, but the appliance manufacturers never dissapoint and they always make the loopiest "What planet are they from?" movies imaginable. (See Frigidaire Finale and 'Match Your Mood' for other examples). This movie starts off with a woman going to the Futurama exhibit at the 1964 New York World's Fair. It's one of those sit down rides I guess, and the narrator explains to us the many environments we could move to (razing rain forests and the mountains are mentioned, which makes this viewer somewhat uncomfortable). From there, we take a look at the house of tommorow, and that's when, I'm sorry, I LITERALLY began to chortle. Looking at the design of the house will make you too. We then see a woman go into to kitchen of tommorow and demonstrate some not-really out there inventions of tommorow (although cooking a roast in a few minutes still has yet to be perfected). The film THEN LEAPFROGS into hilarity by going into designs from the far corners of the world. The kitchens AND the actress herself morph into many worldly designs, all of which I have to break down:
The "Mediterranian": The Model is dressed in some HEAVY 60's clothes, and lights a candle and sways! Groooovy! She explores her "Mediterranian" style kitchen comes with a counter stove which she can't stop fondling and a fridge which she keeps a HUGE ready-made salad in, just in case you know.
After a few more fondling of kitchen knick-knacks, the kitchen AND the actress morph into an Indian (You know, the "Exotic East") setting, where she drinks tea, does some more swaying, fondles her fridge, then visits her washer and dryer in a Gazebo/temple like setting! This W/D combo looks to be together and set in an IMPOSSIBLE angle for anyone to put in their laundry room comfortably.
After that, we go to the Orient. The actress plays a horrible geisha stereotype as she demonstrates this weird oven rack. After showing off more appliances and tasting some soup..
It seagues into a Spanish setting, where she opens her oven to look inside while wearing this dangerously loose blouse which makes contact with the oven rack! (Clucks tongue and rolls eyes). After fondling more knick knacks and of course, ending with a caress of the air conditioner, it all ends with her, of course, waking up. Her son and husband ask about how she liked the World Fair, and she replies, "Everything I saw was out of this world!" I'll say! A MUST SEE on this site!
Reviewer: cashel - - November 1, 2003
Subject: 1960,s style selling
the first half is a mildly entertaining fantasy with good color photography...The remainder is acommercial selling washing machines, refrigerators,stoves,refrigrerators..Recommended as TRIVIA
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